Can You Skydive Through Clouds?

Can You Skydive Through Clouds?

Published: August 23, 2021

Of those that peer upwards with eyes trained to the sky, most have contemplated just what those big fluffy clouds would feel like. Pillowy soft? Thick and spongy? Or just a puff of gentle cool mist? The debate is still open. But, now that a skydive is on the books, you think it could be the perfect time to find out.

Alas, not so much...

Tempting as it may be to skydive through a cloud, you're unlikely to get the chance to give it a go. The aviation industry is fairly strict when it comes to skydiving weather conditions, so if it is a cloudy overcast day, depending on the altitude of the clouds, you may not be able to skydive-at least not until the clouds dissipate.

We promise our intention isn't just to dash your childhood hopes and dreams. Here are three reasons why skydiving through clouds isn't an option.

skydive through the cloud

1. It's illegal.

Skydiving, although generally considered a self-regulated activity, still falls under the purview of the Federal Aviation Administration. The rules and requirements put forth by the FAA are codified as Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs). Violations of the FARs are illegal. Specifically, the FAR that governs parachute operations is part 105. For ease of reference, we've included an excerpt from the FAR below.

According to Part 105.17:

"No person may conduct a parachute operation, and no pilot in command of an aircraft may allow a parachute operation to be conducted from that aircraft- (a) Into or through a cloud, or (b) When the flight visibility or the distance from any cloud is less than that prescribed in the following table:"

Altitude

Flight visibility (statute miles)

Distance from clouds

1,200 feet or less above the surface regardless of the MSL altitude

3

500 feet below, 1,000 feet above, 2,000 feet horizontal.

More than 1,200 feet above the surface but less than 10,000 feet MSL

3

500 feet below, 1,000 feet above, 2,000 feet horizontal.

More than 1,200 feet above the surface and at or above 10,000 feet MSL

5

1,000 feet below, 1,000 feet above, 1 mile horizontal.

* Table from FAR 105.17

In order to stay in compliance with Federal Aviation Regulations, if cloud requirements are not met, we cannot conduct skydiving operations.

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2. It's (potentially) dangerous.

So, what happens if you skydive through a cloud? Well, it could be that nothing happens, or the consequences could be catastrophic.

As you probably recall from middle school science, in essence, clouds are condensed water vapor, much like fog. Analogously to fog, within a cloud, visibility is significantly reduced. Sometimes cloud layers are thin, but cloud layers can also build to cover thousands of feet both vertically and horizontally. If you were to end up skydiving into a cloud, you would be unable to see if it contained other skydivers/parachutes or aircraft. In order to eliminate unnecessary risk and to prevent in-air collisions, skydiving through clouds is not allowed.

3. It's not as fun as you'd think.

A few puffy clouds hanging around in the distance can make for an incredible view. Not to mention, clouds on the horizon can give you an epic point of reference to judge just how quickly you're zooming through the sky. But just a solid sea of gray? Honestly, it's a whole lot less visually stimulating and a lot less fun.

Trust us, when it comes to the adventure of a lifetime, it's better to wait for the right skydiving weather conditions than to settle for a lesser experience.

Can you skydive through the cloud?

Unsure of what the weather has in store on the day of your jump? Check out the Skydive Long Island weather forecast.

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Skydive Long Island and their team is absolutely the best place to go skydiving! They make sure you feel comfortable, and take your enjoyment and safety as their number one priority.

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